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Veterans' medals

Canada’s largest veterans’ care facility. Working in close partnership with Veterans Affairs Canada, we…
SUNNYBROOK.CA

legion

Membership has its benefits! Join the Legion and access great savings and deals through the Legion’s Member Benefits Package. Let your membership pay for itself! The Royal Canadian Legion has established links with national companies…
LEGION.CA

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You don’t have to be a Veteran to join the Legion! When you join the Legion, you support the many services we offer to Veterans, serving military, RCMP Members, and their families.
LEGION.CA

The Conservatives will announce a new grant for veterans Tuesday, Global News has learned. This marks the third announcement focused on veterans affairs the Harper government has made within the past week.
GLOBALNEWS.CA|BY AMY MINSKYAND VASSY KAPELOS

OTTAWA, ON,  April 2nd 2015 – All Legion Branches will fly their Canadian Flags at half-mast on April 9th 2015 from sunrise to sunset to commemorate Vimy Ridge…
LEGION.CA|BY THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION

'We are very pleased to release the 2015 Warriors' Day Parade Poster. A pdf version is available from our website www.thewarriorsdayparade.ca'

We are very pleased to release the 2015 Warriors’ Day Parade Poster. A pdf version is available from our website www.thewarriorsdayparade.ca


Two Pennsylvania residents also die in fiery accident
THEGLOBEANDMAIL.COM

'God Bless our Troops...'

God Bless our Troops…


The story of how Canadian soldiers captured Vimy Ridge in April 1917 has become almost mythological in Canada’s public consciousness. Should this…
LEGIONMAGAZINE.COM

Some provincial branches of the Royal Canadian Legion are no longer using poppy funds to help pay for service dogs to treat post-traumatic stress disorder…
CBC.CA

The Conservatives will announce a new grant for veterans Tuesday, Global News has learned. This marks the third announcement focused on veterans affairs the Harper government has made within the past week.
GLOBALNEWS.CA|BY AMY MINSKYAND VASSY KAPELOS

'Why was the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier created? #RememberThem'

Why was the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier created? ‪#‎RememberThem‬


Never before seen footage from WWII! 31 rolls of undeveloped film belonging to an unknown WWII soldier discovered and restored.
EARTHPORM.COM

Some provincial branches of the Royal Canadian Legion are no longer using poppy funds to help pay for service dogs to treat post-traumatic stress…
CBC.CA

The Harper government is poised to resolve a decades-long dispute with veterans groups by announcing significant changes to benefits for injured reservists in…
CTVNEWS.CA

OTTAWA, ON, March 18th 2015 – More than 3,100 Veterans with disability claims sought the help of Legion Service Officers in 2014. While another 500 Veterans…
LEGION.CA|BY THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION

Montreal resto-bar Furco is under fire after turning away a group of uniformed soldiers last weekend. Reservists from the Canadian Grenadier Guards say they…
MONTREALGAZETTE.COM

A new analysis of money paid to disabled vets by Canada’s closest allies raises questions about the Conservative government’s claim that its support for injured…
THEGLOBEANDMAIL.COM

The new retirement benefit for some of the country’s most severely disabled soldiers would begin at age 65.
GLOBALNEWS.CA|BY STAFF

Pershmerga spokesman says Canadian soldiers showed up unannounced in active combat zone
THEGLOBEANDMAIL.COM

Second World War veteran Ernest Côté, who survived a violent home invasion at his New Edinburgh apartment in December, is to be remembered at a funeral…
CBC.CA

A Canadian soldier based in Petawawa, Ont., has been killed in a friendly fire incident in Iraq, according to a Canadian Forces news release.
CBC.CA

OTTAWA – Following the newly instated policy that requires veterans to verify lost limbs, Ottawa is now also requiring deceased veterans to prove thei…
THEBEAVERTON.COM|BY EMMA OVERTON

The Legion salutes our military women on International Women’s Day and proudly welcomes serving and retired servicewomen and women in the RCMP to join the Legion.
LEGION.CA|BY THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION

Does Canada have a solemn obligation owed to those who have been disabled or killed through military service? Prime Minister Robert Borden told the troops in 1917:…
LEGION.CA|BY THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION

Legion Rolls Out the Welcome Mat

OTTAWA, ON, February 26th 2015 – The Dominion Executive Council of the Royal Canadian Legion re-affirmed its commitment to roll out the welcome mat to Canada’s Veterans as well as the Canadian public during a Council Meeting held at Legion House between 20 and 22 February 2015.

http://www.legion.ca/article/legion-rolls-out-the-welcome-mat/


OTTAWA, ON, 18 February 2015 – Almost a thousand homeless and near homeless Veterans have been helped by The Royal Canadian Legion through its “Leave the Streets…
LEGION.CA|BY THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION

Last year when upon getting a new chair it was felt by VAC that I didn’t get the appropriate paperwork — which was a doctor’s note saying “Due to transformal…
HUFFINGTONPOST.CA

“My buddy Paul is a veteran,” Mercer said. “He lost both his legs in Afghanistan. Every year they make him prove over and over again his legs are still gone.”
HUFFINGTONPOST.CA

'Veterans of the Devil’s Brigade honoured with U.S. Congressional Gold Medal. </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Congratulations and thank you for your service! #RememberThem</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>More information: http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid=928029'

Veterans of the Devil’s Brigade honoured with U.S. Congressional Gold Medal.

Congratulations and thank you for your service! ‪#‎RememberThem‬

More information: http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid=928029


Comedian Rick Mercer targets the absurdity of the Canada government’s treatment of veterans. More: Vubble | Military Source: MercerReport
VUBBLEPOP.COM

The Royal Canadian Legion will look forward to meeting with Mr. Erin O’Toole, the new Minister of Veterans Affairs Canada to discuss the long list of items it has been pushing this government for action on in 2014. Most immediately,…
LEGION.CA|BY THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION

Former Air Force navigator and new Conservative MP Erin O’Toole takes over portfolio
THEGLOBEANDMAIL.COM

At some Branches, people are met with a certain ‘grumpiness’ that is not acceptable. It’s time to address this situation, and quite frankly it must be addressed now and with urgency. It’s time to get the grump out of the Legion!
LEGION.CA|BY THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION

'Remember all of our men and women in uniform who won't be home for Christmas. #RealHero'

Remember all of our men and women in uniform who won’t be home for Christmas.‪#‎RealHero‬


'At age 23, British secret agent Phyllis Latour Doyle parachuted into occupied Normandy in May 1944 to gather intelligence on Nazi positions in preparation for D-Day. As an agent for the British Special Operations Executive (SOE), Doyle secretly relayed 135 coded messages to the British military before France's liberation in August. For seventy years, her contributions to the war effort have been largely unheralded but, last week, the 93-year-old was finally given her due when she was awarded France's highest honor, the Chevalier of the Legion of Honour.  </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Doyle first joined the Women's Auxiliary Air Force at age 20 in 1941 to work as a flight mechanic but SOE recruiters spotted her potential and offered her a job as a spy. A close family friend, her godmother's father who she viewed as her grandfather, had been shot by the Nazis and she was eager to support the war effort however she could. Doyle immediately accepted the SOE's offer and began an intensive training program. In addition to learning about encryption and surveillance, trainees also had to pass grueling physical tests. Doyle described how they were taught by a cat burglar who had been released from jail on "how to get in a high window, and down drain pipes, how to climb over roofs without being caught."</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>She first deployed to Aquitaine in Vichy France where she worked for a year as a spy using the codename Genevieve. Her most dangerous mission, however, began on May 1, 1944 when she jumped out of a US Air Force bomber and landed behind enemy lines in Nazi-occupied Normandy. Using the codename Paulette, she posed as a poor teenage French girl. Doyle used a bicycle to tour the region, often under the guise of selling soap, and passed information to the British on Nazi positions using coded messages. In an interview with the New Zealand Army News magazine, she described how risky the mission, noting that "The men who had been sent just before me were caught and executed. I was told I was chosen for that area (of France) because I would arouse less suspicion."</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>She also explained how she concealed her codes: "I always carried knitting because my codes were on a piece of silk -- I had about 2000 I could use. When I used a code I would just pinprick it to indicate it had gone. I wrapped the piece of silk around a knitting needle and put it in a flat shoe lace which I used to tie my hair up." Coded messages took a half an hour to send and the Germans could identify where a signal was sent from in an hour and a half so Doyle moved constantly to avoid detection. At times, she stayed with Allied sympathizers but often she had to sleep in forests and forage for food. </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>During her months in Normandy, Doyle sent 135 secret messages -- invaluable information on Nazi troop positions that was used to help Allied forces prepare for the Normandy landing on D-Day and during the subsequent military campaign. Doyle continued her mission until France's liberation in August 1944. </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Following the war, Doyle eventually settled in New Zealand where she raised four children. It was only in the past 15 years that she told them about her career as a spy. In presenting the Chevalier of the Legion of Honour to Doyle last week, French Ambassador Laurent Contini commended her courage during the war, stating: "I have deep admiration for her bravery and it will be with great honor that I will present her with the award of Chevalier de l’Ordre National de la Légion d’Honneur, France’s highest decoration."</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>To read more about Phyllis Latour Doyle's incredible story, visit The Telegraph at http://bit.ly/1I1nvi2</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>The stories of women heroes of WWII are unfortunately rarely told but an incredible recent book makes it easy to introduce a new generation to these extraordinary women: "Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue," recommended for ages 13 and up, at http://www.amightygirl.com/women-heroes-of-world-war-ii</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>A complementary book telling the stories of heroic women of WWI was also just released: "Women Heroes of World War I: 16 Remarkable Resisters, Soldiers, Spies, and Medics" at http://www.amightygirl.com/women-heroes-of-world-war-i</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>For an excellent book about another real-life WWII resistance fighter, British special agent Pearl Witherington, we also recommend "Code Name Pauline," for ages 12 and up at http://www.amightygirl.com/code-name-pauline </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>For two highly recommended novels about women resistance fighters of WWII, both for ages 13 and up, check out "Code Name Verity" (http://www.amightygirl.com/code-name-verity) and "Rose Under Fire" (http://www.amightygirl.com/rose-under-fire). </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>To browse our entire collection of stories of girls and women living through the WWII period, including numerous stories related to the Holocaust, visit our "WWII / Holocaust" section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/history-biography/history-world?cat=186'

At age 23, British secret agent Phyllis Latour Doyle parachuted into occupied Normandy in May 1944 to gather intelligence on Nazi positions in preparation for D-Day. As an agent for the British Special Operations Executive (SOE), Doyle secretly relayed 135 coded messages to the British military before France’s liberation in August. For seventy years, her contributions to the war effort have been largely unheralded but, last week, the 93-year-old was finally given her due when she was awarded France’s highest honor, the Chevalier of the Legion of Honour.

Doyle first joined the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force at age 20 in 1941 to work as a flight mechanic but SOE recruiters spotted her potential and offered her a job as a spy. A close family friend, her godmother’s father who she viewed as her grandfather, had been shot by the Nazis and she was eager to support the war effort however she could. Doyle immediately accepted the SOE’s offer and began an intensive training program. In addition to learning about encryption and surveillance, trainees also had to pass grueling physical tests. Doyle described how they were taught by a cat burglar who had been released from jail on “how to get in a high window, and down drain pipes, how to climb over roofs without being caught.”

She first deployed to Aquitaine in Vichy France where she worked for a year as a spy using the codename Genevieve. Her most dangerous mission, however, began on May 1, 1944 when she jumped out of a US Air Force bomber and landed behind enemy lines in Nazi-occupied Normandy. Using the codename Paulette, she posed as a poor teenage French girl. Doyle used a bicycle to tour the region, often under the guise of selling soap, and passed information to the British on Nazi positions using coded messages. In an interview with the New Zealand Army News magazine, she described how risky the mission, noting that “The men who had been sent just before me were caught and executed. I was told I was chosen for that area (of France) because I would arouse less suspicion.”

She also explained how she concealed her codes: “I always carried knitting because my codes were on a piece of silk — I had about 2000 I could use. When I used a code I would just pinprick it to indicate it had gone. I wrapped the piece of silk around a knitting needle and put it in a flat shoe lace which I used to tie my hair up.” Coded messages took a half an hour to send and the Germans could identify where a signal was sent from in an hour and a half so Doyle moved constantly to avoid detection. At times, she stayed with Allied sympathizers but often she had to sleep in forests and forage for food.

During her months in Normandy, Doyle sent 135 secret messages — invaluable information on Nazi troop positions that was used to help Allied forces prepare for the Normandy landing on D-Day and during the subsequent military campaign. Doyle continued her mission until France’s liberation in August 1944.

Following the war, Doyle eventually settled in New Zealand where she raised four children. It was only in the past 15 years that she told them about her career as a spy. In presenting the Chevalier of the Legion of Honour to Doyle last week, French Ambassador Laurent Contini commended her courage during the war, stating: “I have deep admiration for her bravery and it will be with great honor that I will present her with the award of Chevalier de l’Ordre National de la Légion d’Honneur, France’s highest decoration.”

To read more about Phyllis Latour Doyle’s incredible story, visit The Telegraph athttp://bit.ly/1I1nvi2

The stories of women heroes of WWII are unfortunately rarely told but an incredible recent book makes it easy to introduce a new generation to these extraordinary women: “Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue,” recommended for ages 13 and up, athttp://www.amightygirl.com/women-heroes-of-world-war-ii

A complementary book telling the stories of heroic women of WWI was also just released: “Women Heroes of World War I: 16 Remarkable Resisters, Soldiers, Spies, and Medics” at http://www.amightygirl.com/women-heroes-of-world-war-i

For an excellent book about another real-life WWII resistance fighter, British special agent Pearl Witherington, we also recommend “Code Name Pauline,” for ages 12 and up at http://www.amightygirl.com/code-name-pauline

For two highly recommended novels about women resistance fighters of WWII, both for ages 13 and up, check out “Code Name Verity” (http://www.amightygirl.com/code-name-verity) and “Rose Under Fire” (http://www.amightygirl.com/rose-under-fire).

To browse our entire collection of stories of girls and women living through the WWII period, including numerous stories related to the Holocaust, visit our “WWII / Holocaust” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/…/history-biograp…/history-world…


 

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